Proud Music licenses “Got better things to do” (by Frank Herrlinger) for the campaign LEGO

Nowadays, children spend much more time in front of the television set and less time playing than they did decades ago. This info trailer is about a campaign LEGO led to encourage children to view less television and play more, while still using the media as a promotional means. With the support of the Nickelodeon.de channel, LEGO accomplished its goal. Nickelodeon television went off the air for six hours on May 28, 2010, and told children to go play. Up to that point, the manufacturer had advertised legally on the channel, giving parents and children the chance to buy their products. The outcome of the campaign exceeded expectations, since parents and children did play, sales for LEGO increased exponentially, and Nickelodeon’s acceptance as a TV channel for children grew among parents. The title of the music used for this trailer is most appropriately called “Got better things to do”, and it is by Frank Herrlinger. You may find it in the Proud Music Library.

Proud Music Licenses Music for the 2012 Winter Olympics Teaser

 

Everybody is getting pumped up for the 2012 Winter Olympics, and so are we! Listen to Nils Bergholz’ title “Dirt Gun” on the 2012 Winter Olympics Teaser (dtp entertainment for PC, Wii, and Nintendo 3DS). It is a great example of guitar frenzy that comes from the Indie Punk Rock. Audacious. Dynamic and vibrant. Available in the Proud Music Library.

May I show an Image Film at a fair with a standard license and at the same time present it on its own website?

Yes. The standard license is tied to the use. Under use we differentiate – except for the limit of 1000 copies – the type of use, and not volume. That means that if the music is inserted in a Image Film, it does not matter whether the film is shown at a fair or streamed on the Internet, be it on its own website or that of a third party such as YouTube, Vimeo, or Facebook.

It does make a difference, though, if the film is inserted with commercial purposes. In this context commercial means “to promote the sales of a product (good or service).” The corporate film does not usually have the sales of a product in mind, but rather serves to improve the image of the company. The fact that in this context of the film the company products can be shown is self-evident. But the film’s purpose is not commercial use, as for example, a TV spot. Image spots are an exception. An image spot is an Image Film in the style of a commercial spot, which serves primarily to strengthen a brand. The focus of an image spot is not the company itself; rather the brand is positively emotionally charged through the film/spot. The company’s products may be advertised better through the upload, since the brand already conveys a positive image.

What license do I need for a trailer?

In order to enjoy a music title from the Proud Music Library for a trailer, you need an advertising license. Depending on which media you choose to advertise the trailer, there are online, radio, movie, and TV licenses. Each license type offers separate rights. Online advertising, for example on Yahoo!®, requires the issuance of an online advertising license; for TV advertising, for example on NBC, MTV or a local channel, requires a TV advertising license.

What is a trailer?

Who has not watched a movie preview (lasts between one and three minutes) before, and awoken his curiosity to run to the cinema’s premiere once it was released? How many TV spots (lasts less than a minute) of the latest video games have not lured fans to the store? How about those commercials advertising the newest car, event or dish on a restaurant menu? Whichever form it takes, or whatever its purpose, trailers or teasers are extracts from films, video games, or TV shows such as sitcoms and dramas, which are intended to promote the same.